Meditate on *These* 20 Photos of Aesthetic Galettes to Counter Winter Woes

seabiscuit-baking-blackberries-raspberries-wallpaper

Do not be fooled. These aren’t pies.

No, the galette is a truly transparent dish, openly displaying their goods from the get go. With both sweet and savory options, you’ll be hard pressed to find someone hating on this pastry-based good. Really, if you don’t love them just yet, you simply haven’t consumed (or seen) enough of them!


1.

Salted Caramel Apple Galette by Sally’s Baking Addiction

2.

Butternut Squash Galette with Gruyere

3.

Spinach & Potato Galette by Kale & Caramel
Lily, author of Kale & Caramel, describes galettes as sexy — we couldn’t agree more. 😏

4.

Ricotta, Potato & Spring Pea Galette by Baking the Goods

5.

Apricot Galette by Leite’s Culinaria

6.

10-Minute Strawberry Galette by Platings and Pairings

7.

Spring Vegetable Vegan Galette by Cilantro and Citronella

8.

Roasted Vegetable Galette by Diala’s Kitchen

9.

Raspberry Ginger Stone Fruit Galette by Half Baked Harvest

10.

Halloumi Crusted Delicata Squash Galette by Baked Ambrosia

11.

Gluten-Free Blueberry Galette by Happy Kitchen.Rocks

12.

Everything Bagel Galettelettes with Tomatoes and Scallion Cream Cheese by my name is yeh

13.

Sour Cherry Galette by Unicorns in the Kitchen

14.

Pear Galette with Sparkling Cranberries by Holley Grainger

15.

Butternut Squash Fennel Apple Galette Nutrition Stripped

16.

Mini Chocolate Pudding Galettes by Bev Cooks

17.

Apricot Almond Galette by Viktoria’s Table

18.

box=970x0

Plum & Almond Galette by Angela Casley

19.

Pecan Pie Galette by A Sassy Spoon

20.

Rosemary Pear Concord Grape Galette by Snixy Kitchen


Boy. What an adventure this has been. Shoutout to all of the talented culinary artists out there mixing and matching ingredients to craft these stunning galettes. I can confidently speak for the masses here when I say thank you — as winter advances, may these images warm our hearts as the temperature continues to drop.

 

 


This article was written by Holly Ratcliff who regularly seeks out aesthetic food threads for comfort. Holly studied poetry at Texas State University. Her literary research is available through the Texas State Undergraduate Research Journal: “‘Too much water hast thou, poor Ophelia’: An Object-Oriented Reading of Hamlet.” Twitter/Instagram: @HollytheHare

One comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s